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The chemist from RUDN University, together with the colleagues, first created molecules’ catchers for energy source molecules of cells

The chemist from RUDN University, together with the colleagues, first created molecules’ catchers for energy source molecules of cells

For the first time, a team of Russian scientists together with RUDN University synthesized calixarenes capable of “trapping” adenosine triphosphoric acid (ATA) molecules and enclosing them inside their cavity. ATA molecules are a universal source of energy for most biochemical processes. They also act as an intercellular mediator.

The authors created a kind of molecular sensor that can not only recognize the ATA molecule among others, but also “capture” it. This was achieved thanks to the attachment to the upper part of the "bowl" of molecular receptors - groups of atoms that selectively bind only to compounds of a certain type. The atomic groups containing nitrogen introduced by scientists have shown high efficiency in the binding of ATA in solution.
Scientists synthesized several types of calixarenes. The first type included compounds with two or four attached receptors in the upper part of the molecule, the second in the lower part of the molecule. The remaining several types included combinations of the first two. After a detailed analysis of the chemical properties of each type of compound, the scientists revealed differences in their behavior and properties.
So, for example, when two specific groups are inserted in the lower part of the molecule, it begins to more efficiently bind adenosine diphosphoric acid (ADA) - a compound formed during the partial decomposition of ATA.

“Over the past two decades, many research groups have paid great attention to the synthesis of host molecules with high affinity for biologically important substances. Among these methods, the recognition and transfer of nucleotides — adenosine diphosphoric and adenosine triphosphoric acids — is of particular importance due to their great biological significance. Adenine-containing nucleotides are important as a universal source of energy and as intracellular mediators in many biological processes. For the first time, we created molecules based on calixarenes that can recognize ATA and ADA in a solution and bind to them at low concentrations ”says Viktor Khrustalyov, one of the authors of the work, doctor of chemical sciences, head of the inorganic chemistry department of the RUDN University.

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03 Nov 2017
RUDN University organized the first 5G Summit R&D Russia on June 19 - 20, 2017
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30 Dec
Biologists from RUDN University discovered the secret of flaxseed oil with long shelf life

Biologists from RUDN University working together with their colleagues from the Institute of Molecular Biology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Flax studied the genes that determine the fatty acid composition in flaxseed oil and identified polymorphisms in six of them. The team also found out what gene variations could extend the shelf life of flaxseed oil. This data can be used to improve the genetic selection of new flax breeds. The results were published in the BMC Plant Biology journal.

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19 Apr
Dentists from RUDN University Presented a New Classification of Root Canal Shape Changes

Individual characteristics of the shape and cross-section of the root canal are one of the main issues for dentists. When treating a root canal, a doctor needs to properly clean it, fill it, and carry out a rebuilding procedure so that a canal is sealed. The first stage of endodontic treatment requires detailed knowledge of root canal anatomy. A team of dentists from RUDN University studied and classified various changes in root canal shapes. The new classification will help doctors avoid diagnostic errors, better select their tools, and treat patients more efficiently.

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19 Apr
A chemist from RUDN developed a green catalyst for pharmaceutical and industrial chemistr

Many production facilities (e.g. plastic manufacturers, pharma companies, and others) use nanocatalysts that contain palladium—an expensive component that is not sustainably produced. A chemist from RUDN University found a way to reduce palladium consumption and to make its manufacture more eco-friendly. He developed a catalyst based on a substance that comes from plant waste. Using his invention, manufacturers could cut palladium consumption in half. Moreover, new catalysts can be reused multiple times without any decrease in efficiency.

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